Getting out in Nature

Getting out in Nature banner

Summer is here and the lock down is over, finally. If you are anything like me, then the thought of getting outdoors and hopefully away somewhere, has turned to a craving. Whether it’s heading out to camp, tenting in a provincial park or simply slipping on some comfortable footwear to take a long walk in nature, it’s time we rediscover the world outside. I know that we can’t really travel anywhere yet, but there are beauties to discover in our own backyard, such as an afternoon drive to Kakabeka Falls.

Speaking of water, the delights of Lake Superior are ever present and the sight of the Sleeping Giant has never failed to fill me with awe. Perhaps this year, rather than just walking along the marina, it might be time to try a water sport. The books Paddle Your Own Kayak by Gary and Joanie McGuffin or Paddle Your Own Canoe Nick Offerman offer a step-by-step approach on everything from paddling basics to water rescues and they contain gorgeous photography. If sailing is more your calling, the library is full of books ranging from The Sailing Bible: the complete guide for all sailors from novice to expert by Jeremy Evans to Sailing for Dummies by J.J. and Peter Isler.

cover of Paddle Your Own Kayak

If you’re planning something more landlocked then Ben Gadd’s The Canadian Hiker’s & Backpacker’s Handbook, is an encyclopedia of everything you need to know for a successful trip. Unless you are a hardcore outdoors person or practicing for the reality show Alone, then the book Bushcraft: Outdoor Skills and Wilderness Survival by Mors Kochanksi might be a better choice. For the rest of us, chances are we won’t be travelling alone, so there are a number of books to help create a great family experience. Helen Olsson’s The Down and Dirty Guide to Camping with Kids or The Camping Activity Book for Families: The Kid Tested Guide to Fun in the Outdoors by Linda Parker Hamilton, are two of the many books at the library that are jam packed full of ideas to make any outing fun and educational. The books even deal with the not so great parts of being in nature like heavy rain, mosquitoes and where to go to the bathroom.

cover of the Great Canadian Bucket List

A great deal of the fun of going on vacation is in the planning, so as Ontario and eventually the rest of Canada opens up again, the shelves are bulging with ideas to help plan an amazing trek. The city and the surrounding area are great places to explore. Spend an afternoon at Chippewa, a day at Fort William Historical Park, or an overnight at Sleeping Giant Provincial Park – each day can be a different experience. A good book to bring along is 50 Unusual Things to See in Ontario by Ron Brown, which takes a tour of the province beginning locally and illustrates some of Ontario’s little known attractions.

If a car trip is in order, try Mark Richardson’s book, Canada’s Road. It’s the story of a journey on the Trans-Canada Highway from St. John’s to Victoria, and is full of fun-facts, stories and misadventures. For train buffs, Daryl T. Adair’s Canadian Rail Travel, discovers the vastness of our land by rail. To plan for your own bucket list, grab Robin Escock’s The Great Canadian Bucket List: One of a Kind Travel Experiences. Escock crossed the country from West to East and South to North, and created an unforgettable list of truly Canadian adventures.

cover of Camping with Kids

This year, the Thunder Bay Public Library has partnered with Ontario Parks to provide our patrons the ability to borrow a free day use vehicle pass that can be used at over 100 operating provincial parks. Patrons may “sign out” a pass for a week. Please check our website for more details

If you need a library card, or wish to renew your card to check out any of the titles listed here, please call us at 345-8275, Monday to Friday from 10 am to 4 pm or send us an email to comments@tbpl.ca and we’ll get you set up. Hopefully this column inspires you to get out and explore. PS. Bring snacks.

Lori Kauzlarick- www.tbpl.ca. If you have a comment about today’s column, we would love to hear from you.  

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